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acquired a 65 per cent controlling interest in

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    5 de julio de 2018 23:05:03 PDT

    A new owner is in place. Breeland Speaks Jersey . A new coach is on the way. And for the first time in 14 years, Sacramento Kings fans can celebrate a new era. The Maloof family completed the sale of the Kings and Sleep Train Arena to a group led by TIBCO Software chairman Vivek Ranadive on Friday, officially transferring ownership of the NBA franchise. Ranadives group acquired a 65 per cent controlling interest in the team at a total franchise valuation of more than $534 million, topping the NBA record of $450 million that Joe Lacob and Peter Guber bought the Golden State Warriors for in 2010. "We are pleased for both the Maloof family and the Ranadive group, but particularly pleased for the fans of the Kings," NBA Commissioner David Stern said. Brothers George, Joe and Gavin Maloof also released statements thanking NBA owners, Stern and the familys limited partners with the Kings. George Maloof specifically praised Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson and the City Council "for their efforts and loyalty to the Sacramento community." Ranadive already has been busy making moves to rebuild the fallen franchise. The Kings have an agreement in place with Warriors assistant Mike Malone to become their head coach, a person familiar with the decision told The Associated Press. The person, speaking on condition of anonymity because they werent authorized to speak publicly, said Malone was Ranadives top choice. Malones hiring officially ends Keith Smarts tenure. Smart took over the Kings for the fired Paul Westphal in January 2012 and had one year remaining on his contract. Ranadive, formerly a minority owner or the Warriors, still has to hire a general manager -- a move that typically comes before finding a coach; the contract for president of basketball operations Geoff Petrie ends June 30. In a statement released through the Kings, Ranadive thanked all involved. "Mayor Kevin Johnson and the leadership group of Sacramento should be commended for their relentless efforts, hard work and tireless drive to keep the Kings in the city where they belong," Ranadive said. "We also extend our thanks to the Maloof Family for their support and co-operation throughout the sale process. Because of their efforts, this team has risen to an impressive legacy, which includes the most passionate fanbase in the NBA. "Again, thank you to Sacramento Kings fans for their unwavering commitment and loyalty to myself and this organization. Without them, this success would not have become a reality. At the end of the day, this team belongs to the people of Sacramento, and our mission is to support them. We are excited to begin the process of building a 21st century franchise that will be a source of pride and excitement for years to come." The sales completion capped a comeback few outside Californias capital city believed would happen. After owners blocked the Maloofs agreement with investor Chris Hansen to buy and relocate the Kings to Seattle earlier in May at a total franchise valuation of $625 million, the family pushed ahead with the "backup offer" to sell the team to Ranadives group. The Sacramento group also includes 24 Hour Fitness founder Mark Mastrov, former Facebook senior executive Chris Kelly and the Jacobs family that owns communications giant Qualcomm. "We congratulate Vivek Ranadive and the entire Sacramento investor group for their willingness to come forward and purchase the franchise for the people of Sacramento. We are confident they will provide the stewardship necessary to continue to guide the organization to successful levels," George Maloof said. The transfer of the team ended the Maloof familys topsy-turvy reign as majority owners of the team. The Kings reached the playoffs for the first seven years under the Maloofs and missed each of the last seven. Sacramento won back-to-back Pacific Division titles in the 2001-02 and 2002-03 seasons, advancing to the 2002 Western Conference finals, when it lost in heartbreaking fashion to the eventual champion Los Angeles Lakers in seven games. After that, the franchise started its slow and painful decline. The Maloofs, once the toast of Californias capital city, fell out of favour with fans. The suburban arena aged rapidly. Ticket sales declined. And the family explored moving the franchise to Las Vegas, Anaheim and Virginia Beach over several years until announcing an agreement with Hansens group in January. Led by Johnson, Sacramento fought back and made it too difficult for NBA owners to allow the Kings to move to Seattle. The mayor, a former NBA All-Star guard, got the Sacramento City Council to approve a non-binding financing plan for a $447 million downtown arena with a $258 million public subsidy. The Maloofs still had to agree to sell the franchise to Ranadives group. And in the end, they did -- after raising the value of the franchise to a record price. "The success of the Sacramento Kings has been due largely in part to the dedication and enthusiasm of our team members, coaches, players, and fans," Joe Maloof said. "Since our family has owned the franchise, the people of Sacramento have warmly brought the Kings into their hearts and for that we will always be grateful. As we look forward to an exciting new chapter in our family business enterprise, we will never forget the people of Sacramento and everything they have done for the Kings organization."Tremon Smith Jersey . The Browns coaching search remains incomplete. Chiefs Jerseys Hoodies . With the short-handed Warriors needing help from someone -- anyone -- to stop a three-game skid, ONeal returned from right knee and groin injuries that had sidelined him for four games and put up season highs with 18 points and eight rebounds. It was just enough to help lift Golden State to a 102-101 victory over the New Orleans Pelicans on Tuesday night. http://www.cheapkansascitychiefsjerseys.com/ . In the lead up - which seemed to begin the moment Mike Geiger blew the whistle in Houston last Thursday night - the Impact rumour mill went into overdrive. The speculation went into meltdown mode, of the golden nugget variety.ARDMORE, Pa. -- Justin Rose could see all the pieces coming together in this U.S. Open. The sun was breaking through the clouds Sunday evening at Merion as he stood in the 18th fairway with a one-shot lead. That famous Ben Hogan plaque was in front of him, a road marker bronze that one pure swing and two putts might be all that stood between Rose and his first major championship. That and Phil Mickelson in the final group behind him. Rose followed his script to perfection with a par. So did Mickelson, who cant seem to win a U.S. Open no matter how hard he tries. Rose drilled a 4-iron just through the green and used a 3-wood to bunt the ball to an inch of the cup for par. Mickelson, who made two careless bogeys on the back nine, needed a birdie on an 18th hole that didnt yield a single one all weekend at Merion. "What a piece of silverware to be sitting to my right," Rose said, gazing at the shiny trophy after closing with an even-par 70. "Its just an incredible experience and a childhood dream come true at this point." It was a recurring nightmare for Mickelson, extending his record collection of silver medals in the major he covets. "Heartbreak," Mickelson said on his 43rd birthday. "This is tough to swallow after coming so close. This was my best chance of all. I had a golf course I really liked. I felt this was as good as opportunity as you could ask for. It really hurts." With remarkable poise and three pure swings under pressure, Rose became the first Englishman in 43 years to win Americas national championship. Mickelson extended his U.S. Open record with his sixth runner-up finish, and this one stung. It was the first time he had the outright lead going into the final round. He holed a wedge out of deep rough for an eagle to take back the lead as he headed to the back nine. But he flew the green with a wedge on the par-3 13th hole and made bogey on the easiest hole at Merion. He tried to hit wedge off the green on the 15th hole to give him a good shot at par, only he hit it so hard he made another bogey. And he never caught up. He wonders if hell ever get another chance. "At 43 and coming so close five times, it would have changed the way I look at this tournament altogether and the way I would have looked at my record," Mickelson said, dreaming one last time of winning. "Except that I just keep feeling heartbreak." Rose was pacing in the scoring area, waiting for Mickelson to finish, wondering if he could catch him. At one point, he looked above the TV to that famous photo of Hogan hitting 1-iron into the 18th green in the 1950 U.S. Open to set up a playoff that he won the next day. "When I walked over the hill and saw my drive sitting perfectly in the middle of the fairway, with the sun coming out, it was kind of almost fitting," Rose said. "And I just felt like at that point it was a good iron shot onto the green, two putts -- like Hogan did -- and possibly win this championship. So I felt like I did myself justice, and probably put enough of a good swing where Ben Hogan might have thought it was a decent shot, too." As usual, someones big moment in the U.S. Open came at Mickelsons expense. All the stars were aligned. None of the putts fell in. Lefty somehow blasted out of the rough to 8 feet on the 16th hole, but he missed the putt. His tee shot on the par-3 17th was just short enough that it didnt catch the funnel toward the hole, and he missed a long birdie putt. From the rough left of the 18th fairway, he couldnt quite reach the green and to chip in from about 40 yards. With his caddie tending the flag, Mickelsons chip raced by the cup, and Rose was the U.S. Open champion. Mickelson wound up with a bogey on the 18th for a 74 and tied for second with Jason Day, who closed with a 71. Day appeared to salvage his round by chipping in for bogey on the 11th hole, and he was still in the picture when he made a 12-foot par putt on the 17th to stay one shot behind. But he put his approach into the bunker left of the 18th green, blasted out to about 7 feet and missed the putt. The back nine was a four-way battle that included Hunter Mahan, who played in the last group with Mickelson. He was one shot out of the lead until he three--putted the 15th hole for a double bogey, and then closed with back-to-back bogeys when his hopes were gone. Chiefs Jerseys Sale. Mahan had a 75 and tied for fourth with Billy Horschel (74), Ernie Els (69) and Jason Dufner, who had a 67 despite making triple bogey on the 15th hole. David Hearn (71) of Brantford, Ont., finished in a tie for 21st at 11 over, while Mike Weir (69) of Brights Grove, Ont., tied for 28th at 12 over. Rose finished at 1-over 281, eight shots higher than David Grahams winning score in 1981 when the U.S. Open was last held at Merion. The shortest course for a major championship in nearly a decade held up just fine. It was the third time in the last four years that no one broke par in the toughest test of golf. The last Englishman to win the U.S. Open was Tony Jacklin at Hazeltine in 1970, though Rose added to recent dominance of the Union Jack at the U.S. Open as the third winner in four years. The others were Graeme McDowell (2010) and Rory McIlroy (2011) of Northern Ireland. Walking off the 18th green, he looked through the patchy clouds and pointed to the sky, a nod to his late father, Ken, who died of leukemia in September 2002. "I couldnt help but look up at the heavens and think my old man Ken had something to do with it," Rose said. It seems like more than 15 years ago when Rose first starred on the major scene as a 17-year-old amateur who chipped in on the final hole at Royal Birkdale in the 1998 British Open and tied for fourth. He turned pro the next week, and then missed the cut in his first 21 tournaments. But he stayed the course and slowly picked off big tournaments -- including the AT&T National in 2010 just down the road at Aronimink. The U.S. Open takes him to another level and moves him to No. 3 in the world. Tiger Woods turned out to be nothing more than an afterthought. He hit out-of-bounds on his second hole and made triple bogey, and closed with a 74 to finish at 13-over 293, his worst score as a pro in the U.S. Open, and matching his worst score in any major. The score wasnt nearly that bad considering the golf course, with its tricky contours on the greens and punishing rough. Mickelson wore all black when he arrived for the final round, and in a brief TV interview he said, "The best for me is to play well and have fun." Sunday at the U.S. Open is rarely fun. Just ask Donald, who was only two shots behind starting the final round. It all crumbled when he pulled his tee shot on the par-3 third hole -- so long and hard that Donald hit a driver -- and struck a standard-bearer. She was on the ground for several minutes, and Donald appeared visibly shaken. He shot 42 on the back nine. Steve Stricker took his lumps on one hole, and it was ugly. One shot behind, he pushed his tee shot on the par-5 second hole out-of-bounds. After hitting the next tee shot into the fairway, he tried to lay up with a 4-iron and hit a shank out-of-bounds. Stricker had to make a 7-foot putt to escape with a triple-bogey 8. Former Masters champion Charl Schwartzel, trying to give South Africa a major for the fourth straight year, opened with a birdie and a tie for the lead. That became a distant memory, however, when he dropped seven shots over the seven holes and closed out his front nine with a 42. Horschel wore pants with octopus prints, and he putted like he had eight arms. Out in 39, he opened the back nine with a pair of three-putts. For a short time, it looked as though Mickelson might join this parade of pretenders when he three-putted for double bogey twice in three holes on the front nine. And then came his shot out of the rough on the 10th, and he was on his way -- but not for long. Rose made his share of mistakes, too, like the three-putt bogey on the 11th and a horrible shot out of the bunker on the 14th. The difference was his approach into the 12th to 3 feet, followed by a 20-foot birdie putt on the 13th hole. With Mickelson watching so many putts graze the lip, that cushion was all that Rose needed. "This is definitely a tough defeat for Phil," Rose said. "I love the way he plays the game. He plays fearless golf. He keeps everybody guessing." But not at a U.S. Open, where it never ends well for him. Cheap Nike NFL Jerseys Cheap NFL Autographed Jerseys China Jerseys Wholesale NFL Jerseys From China Wholesale NFL Autographed Jerseys Wholesale Nike NFL Jerseys Cheap Jerseys From China ' ' '